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Violent Family Brawl Breaks Out at Disneyland

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7RBWuYFeg9Y&has_verified=1

A violent fight caught on camera got a family kicked out of Disneyland Saturday, July 6.

What We Know:

  • In the video, a verbal fight between a man and a woman escalates when the woman spits on the man and he begins to hit her. Other members of the family slowly get involved before security arrives nearly four minutes after the fight broke out. Bystanders also began to get involved in breaking up the fight while waiting on security.
  • A Disneyland spokesperson confirmed that the fight in the video did indeed occur at Toontown in the park Saturday and all parties are from the same family.
  • Disneyland security responded to the fight in Toontown and kicked the family out of the park. “Any type of violence is inexcusable and will not be tolerated,” Disneyland Resort spokesperson Liz Jaeger said.
  • Disneyland security turned the family over to the Anaheim Police Department, who reported the family was uncooperative but an investigation will continue using the recorded video footage.

Spectators feel frustrated with how long it took security to respond to the fight, forcing bystanders to get involved and feel unsafe.

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Potential Downgrade of Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Status

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Some of the corals here are already bleaching, losing their color, which is a sign that they're being stressed by heat or acidity. The Ocean Agency/XL Catlin Seaview Survey/Richard Vevers

Deteriorating health status puts the Great Barrier Reef’s UNESCO World Heritage Site status in jeopardy. Despite this, Australia rejects recommendations by the United Nations to consider the Reef coral “in danger”.

What We Know:

  • The Great Barrier Reef received World Heritage status in 1981, an honor designating it invaluable to humanity for its cultural, historical, and scientific contributions. There are 1007 other places across the globe deemed worthy of this status, including the Grand Canyon, Egyptian pyramids, and Greece’s Acropolis.
  • The reef is home to 1,625 species of fish, more than 600 species of coral, 133 shark and ray species, and 30 species of whales and dolphins, among many others. 25 percent of all known aquatic species reside in the Great Barrier Reef.
  • On Tuesday, The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) committee warned that urgent protection is needed to preserve remaining coral following three major coral bleaching events. Coral bleaching is caused by changing water temperatures and heat stress.

Dead coral found at lady Elliot island. In the quest to save the Great Barrier Reef, researchers, farmers and business owners are looking for ways to reduce the effects of climate change.
JONAS GRATZER/LIGHTROCKET VIA GETTY IMAGES

  • A UN report claims the Australian government neglects reef health, especially in terms of negating climate change effects. The report found that the Australian government failed to meet water quality and land management targets as well as greenhouse gas reduction goals. According to the report, “The long-term outlook for the ecosystem of the property has further deteriorated from poor to very poor,” with deterioration that “has been more rapid and widespread than was previously evident.”
  • Australia’s Minister for the Environment Sussan Ley and Foreign Minister Marise Payne oppose UN claims, stating that $3 billion is allocated to protect the reef. Ley explains, “The Great Barrier Reef is the best-managed reef in the world and this draft recommendation has been made without examining the Reef first hand and without the latest information.”
  • Tourism in Australia relies heavily on visitations to the Reef, bringing in $6.4 billion annually and 64,000 jobs. Any changes to Reef designations could harm the travel industry fueled by snorkelers and beachgoers.

Next month at UNESCO’s meeting in China, the committee will vote on continuing or revoking the Great Barrier Reef’s World Heritage status.

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Coronavirus

Altruistic COVID-19 Vaccine Intentions Solidified by White House

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A nurse prepares to administer the AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine under the COVAX scheme against the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at the Eka Kotebe General Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia March 13, 2021. REUTERS/Tiksa Negeri/File Photo

Previously, President Joe Biden announced plans to share extra COVID-19 vaccines with foreign countries. The White House unveils intended destinations for all 80 million doses.

What We Know:

  • In May, Biden promised to export 80 million vaccines by the end of June. The US has an excess supply of COVID-19 vaccines, making vaccine diplomacy possible. However, challenges emerge on diplomatic and logistical fronts. Diplomatic challenges include which countries to supply vaccines since infections are intensifying across the globe. Another difficulty is determining quantity allocation. Logistically, transporting condition-sensitive vaccines poses challenges.
  • President Biden stated the US will not operate by trading doses for influence, referencing perceived favor-securing practices by both China and Russia. The United States and other wealthy countries faced criticism early this year for racing ahead with vaccine rollouts while other countries struggled.
  • 41 million of the 80 million doses go to COVAX, a humanitarian program directed in part by the World Health Organization. COVAX’s goal is fair vaccine distribution of 2 billion vaccines by the end of 2021, so far dispensing 88 million.
  • The issue of vaccine discrepancies, targeted by COVAX, is evident when comparing national wealth. Upper-middle-income and high-income countries make up 85.61 percent of the total administered COVID vaccines while low-income countries make up only .029 percent.
  • Accordingly, from the US supply, COVAX settled upon sending 14 million vaccines to Latin American and Caribbean countries, 16 million to Asian countries, and 10 million to African countries. Another 14 million will be distributed to regional priorities, specifically low-income countries. These include Colombia, Argentina, Haiti, other Caribbean countries, Dominican Republic, Costa Rica, Panama, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya, Ghana, Cabo Verde, Egypt, Jordan, Iraq, Yemen, Tunisia, Oman, Ukraine, Kosovo, Georgia, Moldova, Bosnia and West Bank and Gaza.
  • All 80 million of the vaccines are accounted for, however, distribution lags. White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki attributes the slow down to transportation issues as well as language barriers.

While all 80 million vaccines may not depart by the end of June, they are on track to arrive shortly thereafter. The 500 million Pfizer vaccines bought by the US to donate will systematically depart.

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The Supreme Court Unanimously Rules the NCAA Cannot Bar Education-Related Benefits, Says It Violates Federal Antitrust Laws

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The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) specifically ruled that the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) cannot enforce limits on Division I basketball and football players’ college-offered educational benefits.

What We Know:

  • Current NCAA rules state that colleges cannot pay student-athletes. In addition, institutions must cap scholarship amounts to the cost of attendance. The association implemented these rules because officials felt that if they paid athletes, fans would begin to criticize the players’ amateur statuses. This, in turn, would result in fewer admirers.
  • However, SCOTUS rejected their claims; the Justices unanimously ruled that the NCAA cannot restrict relatively modest payments to their players based on amateurism. Justice Neil Gorsuch wrote the court’s opinion, citing that doing so violates antitrust laws.

“The NCAA is not above the law,” wrote Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

  • This case has been around for a while now. Last year, former players, including West Virginia football player Shawne Alston, sued the NCAA for their unfair laws. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in San Francisco determined the collegiate association could not limit educational benefits. This decision permitted payments for things such as musical instruments, scientific equipment, postgraduate scholarships, tutoring, study abroad, academic awards, and internships.
  • Despite this, the appeals court did not allow the NCAA to provide athletes with a salary. Therefore, Alston and others took the case to SCOTUS.
  • The unanimous ruling did not directly imply if institutions can now compensate their players. Instead, Monday’s verdict permits those playing Division I men’s or women’s basketball or Bowl Subdivision football to receive cash/cash-equivalent awards based on their academics or graduation. Universities can now offer scholarships for students to complete undergraduate or graduate degrees. Students may also partake in paid internships once they complete their collegiate sports eligibility.
  • SCOTUS will not require schools to provide the benefits. Alongside this, conferences can impose prohibitions on the benefits if the member school chooses to. However, a conference cannot limit or prevent said assets.
  • With the new, multi-level, victory, the athletes feel ready to challenge other aspects of these rules. One lawyer, Steve Berman, already opened another case against the NCAA related to this one. He will ask for the courts to prevent the NCAA from maintaining rules that restrict the amount of name, image, and likeness (NIL) payments available to athletes.

Berman will also seek “unspecified damages” based on the share of television-rights money and social media earnings plaintiffs could have received if NIL compensation limits did not exist.

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