fbpx
Connect with us

Politics

Majority of Voters Say U.S. Is Racist

Published

on

A new Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll shows that 56% of voters believe that American society is racist.

What We Know:

  • The death of George Floyd and other Black Americans has sparked concerns over discrimination in our country, as 71% now say that race relations are either very or fairly bad.
  • Around 60% said Black people face discrimination while just over 50% said the same of Hispanics in the survey. Support has also risen significantly for movements like Black Lives Matter and athlete’s kneeling during the national anthem. “Americans are concerned about issues of inequality, and George Floyd’s death helped contribute to that,” said Brenda Lee, a pollster who worked on the survey. “We’ve moved the needle a great deal in terms of just clearly identifying that we, as Americans, have an issue with racism in this society.”
  • Perhaps most striking is the disparity between Democrats’ and Republicans’ views on the same issues. The poll found that 90% of Democrats said Black people are discriminated against, and 82% believe American society is racist. On the other hand, only 26% of Republicans said Black people face discrimination, and a small 30% viewed our society as racist.

  • The survey also questioned people’s support or disagreement over movements surrounding the fight for racial equality. 57% percent of voters said they support the protests started as a result of Mr. Floyd’s killing, and 58% said they are more concerned with racial inequality as a result of the demonstrations. 51% of voters support removing Confederate statues from public property, while 47% said they would leave them in place. 52% now say it is appropriate for athletes to kneel during the national anthem, a 9% increase since 2018.
  • President Trump has opposed all of the aforementioned issues that Americans now express concern over, resisting the changes protesters have called for. He has criticized the Black Lives Matter Movement and repeatedly condemned efforts to remove Confederate statues and the Confederate flag. He has also added that NFL players who kneel during the national anthem should be suspended without pay.
  • Efforts to resolve the issue of racism in America has already begun to take form. Larry Johnson, a DeKalb County, Georgia Commissioner, introduced a resolution to make racism a public health issue. “We really have to look at it from a zoning, a housing, an economic stand-point as how we look at racism,” Johnson said. “It would be first for us to lead the way by initiating this resolution, to first acknowledge what African Americans have been dealing with since 1619.”

With a few short months before election day, the poll could be a strong indication of voters’ interests as Democrats hope to push out Donald Trump and take over the Senate.

Comments

comments

Headlines

Rudy Giuliani Travels to Miami to Condemn Cuban Government, Few Attend

Published

on

Former President Donald Trump‘s ex-lawyer went to Little Havana’s Versailles Restaurant the same day Cuban-Americans held a candlelight vigil outside the White House.

What We Know:

  • Rudy Giuliani denounced Cuba’s government to a small crowd. He entered Versailles at 9 a.m., but began his speech at 12:30 p.m. to around 15 people; in his discussion, he called the communist regime one of the most “inhumane, indecent, horrible” ones in history.
  • He continued by scorning President Joe Biden for his delayed reaction to Cuba’s July 11 protests. Despite the fact that Biden released a statement on July 12 standing in solidarity with demonstrators, Giuliani spread misinformation by saying Biden took four days to respond. He further called Biden’s response “pathetic” and criticized his leadership.

“If the president of the United States can’t speak up for freedom clearly, succinctly and with great strength, then he isn’t a real president,” Giuliani said.

  • The former lawyer and New York City mayor also stated he did not believe the coronavirus pandemic provoked Cuba’s demonstrations. He concluded this because he claimed he did not see any signs that read “give me a vaccine;” instead, he only saw posters that had different versions of “Cuba Libertad.” Giuliani’s statement on this concern spread more falsities, as one of the main reasons for the protests was the regime’s insufficient control of COVID-19’s effects on the island.
  • Giuliani also urged Americans to speak out against communism and implied that the Biden administration holds leniency on this issue. He added that Americans must fight these ideals just as hard as Cubans did on July 11.
  • Giuliani’s attendance at the iconic Miami restaurant went unplanned. He declared that he never organized the rally and that he just chose to visit on that day.

Giuliani chose not to respond when asked about low turnout. Regardless, an attendee answered for him, explaining that many Cuban-Americans traveled to the White House to commemorate the 26th of July events and urge Biden to take military action and restore internet to Cuba.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

Headlines

U.S. and Other Nations Condemn Cuba for Arresting Protesters

Published

on

Alongside twenty other countries, the United States asked Cuban leaders to “respect the universal rights and freedoms of the Cuban people, including the free flow of information to all Cubans.”

What We Know:

  • The countries which signed this joint statement include Austria, Brazil, Colombia, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Ecuador, Estonia, Guatemala, Greece, Honduras, Israel, Latvia, Lithuania, Kosovo, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Poland, Republic of Korea, and Ukraine. U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and other foreign ministers condemned Cuba’s mass arrests and asked island leaders to restore internet access.
  • In the document, foreign leaders declared that Cubans exercised “universal freedoms of expression and assembly.” In addition, they stated the islanders could do so, as written in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. They also called for the regime to release those arrested so far.

“The international community will not waver in its support of the Cuban people and all those who stand up for the basic freedoms all people deserve,” the document reads.

  • On July 11, Cubans across the island began demonstrations to call for the end of the 62-year communist regime. Instead of listening to citizens’ cries for help, Cuba President Miguel Díaz-Canel urged government supporters, the military, and police to stop the protesters with violence; it has resulted in the disappearances and deaths of hundreds of Cubans, and also the unjust trials of many. To ensure other countries did not intervene, he also restricted the internet from its people and forced citizens to participate in a rally to support communism.
  • Since protests began in Cuba, exiles in the United States have urged U.S. President Joe Biden to act on behalf of the demonstrators. After some push from Cuban-Americans and politicians alike, Biden decided he would use the Global Magnitsky Act to sanction Cuban military head Alvaro Lopez Miera and the Black Wasps for human rights violations. Doing so would freeze their assets and block them from entering the United States. Pres. Biden is also continuing to find ways to restore web access on the island.

Sec. Blinken additionally wrote in the statement that the U.S. will continue aiding Cuba in its fight for independence. “This joint statement demonstrates that the Cuban people are not alone in their aspirations,” stated Blinken.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

Headlines

Shots Fired at Jovenel Moïse’s Funeral, Prompts U.S. and UN Delegations to Leave Early

Published

on

Shots rang, and Haitian police fired tear gas as late President Jovenel Moïse‘s funeral began in his hometown of Cap Haitien on Friday.

What We Know:

  • Disruptions began as Haiti National Police Chief Léon Charles arrived; people in the crowd called him an assassin and questioned his whereabouts during Moïse’s death. Although the Haitian president held multiple security teams comprised of specialized Haitian national police officers at his residence, over twenty people entered his home, murdered him, and injured his wife.
  • While demonstrations occurred outside the Moïse residence, the funeral proceeded inside. Four military guards kept watching over his Moïse’s coffin as authorities calmed crowds with tear gas.
  • The event officially began when Haiti’s former First Lady, Martine Moïse, entered. As she walked towards the stage, citizens shouted statements such as Mare yo,” “Boule yo,” and “Yo touye Jovenel, Nap vote Martine” — “Tie them up,” “Burn them,” and “They killed Jovenel, we are voting Martine.”
  • Throughout all this, Martine remained stoic and praised her husband alongside her son Joverlein. Martine described him as a progressive leader whose people were killed because of ” the battle he was waging on behalf of the poor.” In addition, Martine said the traitors and the oligarchs betrayed her husband.

  • Due to the sudden unrest, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Linda Thomas-Greenfield and her team left the funeral early. UN’s special representative, Helen La Lime, also left because of the event. Despite this, Thomas-Greenfield met with Haitian leaders, such as new Prime Minister Ariel Henry and predecessor Claude Joseph, prior to leaving.
  • Additionally, U.S. National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan released a statement that declared the United States would continue providing assistance to the Haitian National Police and its government. The Department of Justice and Homeland Security will also keep helping authorities investigate Moïse’s assassination. Further, Sullivan stated the departments would remain working closely with international partners to help Haiti obtain justice.

This information provides an update to a declaration made by President Joe Biden. Last week, Biden announced he would only send Marines to secure the U.S. Embassy in Haiti but would not provide military assistance to the country.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

LIVE TALK RADIO

BNA DAILY PODCAST

Trending