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Whistleblower Alleges ICE Detainees Face Medical Neglect, Hysterectomies

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According to a nurse that works there, immigrants in a US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention center in Georgia are subjected to horrific conditions and treatment, including “jarring medical neglect” and a high rate of hysterectomies among women.

What We Know:

  • A whistleblower complaint was filed by several legal advocacy groups on behalf of Nurse Dawn Wooten, when she came forward with information on the center. Wooten has been a practicing nurse for more than 10 years, spending three of those as an employee of Irwin County Detention Center in Georgia, which is run by private corporation LaSalle Corrections. The complaint, filed on her behalf on September 14th, accused the center of negligence, including poor safety precautions surrounding COVID-19 and generally hazardous and unsanitary conditions.
  • According to the complaint, any immigrant who spoke out about their conditions were regularly put into solitary confinement. Wooten shared that when she attempted to speak out against these conditions, she was demoted and reprimanded. An Intercept article confirmed that Wooten’s account was “bolstered by interviews with another current member of Irwin’s medical staff, who asked not to be named for fear of retaliation, and four people currently or recently detained there”.
  • In the complaint, Wooten reported an alarmingly high rate of hysterectomies, a surgery in which part or all of the uterus is removed, being performed on Spanish-speaking immigrants, many of whom did not appear to understand why they had undergone the procedure. Wooten said that an off-site doctor allegedly performed this procedure on women who complained about heavy menstrual cycles, but it appeared that many of the women did not know what had happened. The complaint alleges that often times, the nurses got consent from patients by “simply googling Spanish”.

“Everybody he sees has a hysterectomy – just about everybody,” Wooten said. “That’s his specialty, he’s the uterus collector. Everybody’s uterus cannot be that bad.”

  • The complaint also alleges health and safety violations in connection to the procedure. The complaint said that one woman was not properly anesthetized during a procedure and overheard the doctor say he had mistakenly removed the wrong ovary, rendering her unable to have children. The complaint also listed another woman who went into surgery to have a cyst drained but ultimately got a hysterectomy instead.

“When I met all these women who had had surgeries, I thought this was like an experimental concentration camp. It was like they’re experimenting with our bodies,” one detainee said, according to the complaint.

  • One of the human rights groups that filed the complaint on the behalf of Wooten, Project South, had previously filed a report against the Irwin detention center in 2017, alleging poor treatment of detainees, including unsanitary conditions, inedible food, and refusing medical care to detainees. “This place is not equipped for humans,” one detained immigrant at Irwin told Project South at the time.
  • Conditions at the detention center have also worsened during the coronavirus pandemic. The complaint says the center refused to test detained immigrants for COVID-19 in a timely manner, underreported COVID-19 cases, and mixed those who had been exposed to COVID-19 with those who had not, knowingly placing staff and detainees at risk of contracting the virus. “There is no social distancing possible in a detention center,” said Azadeh Shahshahani, a human rights attorney at Project South. “We are calling for people to be freed immediately, and we have been calling for this facility to be shut down for a long time.”
  • Shahshahani said they groups plan on taking this whistleblower complaint beyond the detention center itself. The groups plan to file all the documents to Congress as well as to the United Nations, as Shahshahani said the United Nations defines“imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group” as an act of genocide, a crime under international law.
  • ICE responded to the now public complaint, saying that the Irwin County Detention Center has been inspected multiple times and has been found to be in compliance with Performance-Based National Detention Standards. ICE added that “in general, anonymous, unproven allegations, made without any fact-checkable specifics, should be treated with the appropriate skepticism they deserve.”

LaSalle Corrections and Irwin county detention center all refused to comment at this time. You can read Wooten’s shocking in-depth interview and complaint here.

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Altruistic COVID-19 Vaccine Intentions Solidified by White House

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A nurse prepares to administer the AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine under the COVAX scheme against the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at the Eka Kotebe General Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia March 13, 2021. REUTERS/Tiksa Negeri/File Photo

Previously, President Joe Biden announced plans to share extra COVID-19 vaccines with foreign countries. The White House unveils intended destinations for all 80 million doses.

What We Know:

  • In May, Biden promised to export 80 million vaccines by the end of June. The US has an excess supply of COVID-19 vaccines, making vaccine diplomacy possible. However, challenges emerge on diplomatic and logistical fronts. Diplomatic challenges include which countries to supply vaccines since infections are intensifying across the globe. Another difficulty is determining quantity allocation. Logistically, transporting condition-sensitive vaccines poses challenges.
  • President Biden stated the US will not operate by trading doses for influence, referencing perceived favor-securing practices by both China and Russia. The United States and other wealthy countries faced criticism early this year for racing ahead with vaccine rollouts while other countries struggled.
  • 41 million of the 80 million doses go to COVAX, a humanitarian program directed in part by the World Health Organization. COVAX’s goal is fair vaccine distribution of 2 billion vaccines by the end of 2021, so far dispensing 88 million.
  • The issue of vaccine discrepancies, targeted by COVAX, is evident when comparing national wealth. Upper-middle-income and high-income countries make up 85.61 percent of the total administered COVID vaccines while low-income countries make up only .029 percent.
  • Accordingly, from the US supply, COVAX settled upon sending 14 million vaccines to Latin American and Caribbean countries, 16 million to Asian countries, and 10 million to African countries. Another 14 million will be distributed to regional priorities, specifically low-income countries. These include Colombia, Argentina, Haiti, other Caribbean countries, Dominican Republic, Costa Rica, Panama, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya, Ghana, Cabo Verde, Egypt, Jordan, Iraq, Yemen, Tunisia, Oman, Ukraine, Kosovo, Georgia, Moldova, Bosnia and West Bank and Gaza.
  • All 80 million of the vaccines are accounted for, however, distribution lags. White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki attributes the slow down to transportation issues as well as language barriers.

While all 80 million vaccines may not depart by the end of June, they are on track to arrive shortly thereafter. The 500 million Pfizer vaccines bought by the US to donate will systematically depart.

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Uncertainty As In-Person Concerts Return This Summer

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(Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

Starting this summer and extending into the fall, musicians and bands are returning to the stage. Names like Green Day, Harry Styles, and Garth Brooks have announced tour dates.

What We Know:

  • The Foo Fighters kicked off the return of the concert scene with a big show in Madison Square Garden this past Sunday to celebrate the reopening. It was the first time in 400 days that the venue had been used for a concert. In order to attend, guests had to have proof of full vaccination, but COVID protocols for large gatherings continue to vary state by state.
  • As artists continue to announce summer tour dates, it’s clear there is excitement to return to the road. One Republic’s Ryan Tedder told CNN, “I think live music will explode. I think this has created a scenario in which everyone that’s alive has this lease on their time in moving forward, at least for the next year or two.”
  • Touring professionals were hit the hardest when concerts shut down in March of 2020. A lot of crew members are balancing feelings of relief and caution. David Morgan, James Taylor’s front-of-house engineer, stated, “I’m completely vaccinated but there’s still the unknown factor of what happens when you get 15,000 people into an arena. We don’t know that yet. This is all uncharted territory.”
  • Morgan was planning on retiring last year, but the pandemic cost him $100,000 in income, which will force him to be on the road for at least another year. As James Taylor’s tour dates loom, he is apprehensive to see how the events will pan out, “I’m wondering how much physical separation there’s actually going to be. I’m wondering what the vaccine policy in the building is going to be.”
  • Green Day, Fall Out Boy, and Weezer’s “Hella Mega” tour plans on extensive safety protocols. The trio of bands are exclusively performing at outdoor venues and all members of the road team must be vaccinated. A COVID compliance office will travel with them to keep organizers up to date on different states’ regulations. However, unvaccinated fans could lead to a potential outbreak and jeopardize these tours for another period of time.

The financial hardships experienced by concert staff in the last year have left behind some apprehension as the pandemic subsides. While artists and fans alike are excited to experience live performances again, the risk of cancellations is a factor.

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UN Reports Millions Driven From Homes Despite COVID Crisis

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(AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi, File)

Despite COVID-19 restrictions world wide, 3 million people were forced to flee their homes last year due to war, violence, persecution, and other human rights violations.

What We Know:

  • In a Global Trends report released by the UN Refugee Agency, the number of displaced people has risen to 82.4 million. This number surpasses the post World War II record. In fact, there are twice as many forcibly displaced individuals this year than there were a decade ago.
  • Fillippo Grandi, the UN’s high commissioner for refugees, said conflict and effects of climate change in places such as Mozambique, Ethiopia’s Tigray region, and Africa’s Sahel region were major influences. This is the ninth consecutive annual increase of refugees. Grandi said, “This is telling, in a year in which we were all locked down, confined, blocked in our homes, in our communities, in our cities, almost 3 million people have had to actually leave all that behind because they had no other choice.”
  • The report broke down further demographics, saying 5.7 Palestinians, 3.9 Venezuelans, and an additional 20.7 million refugees from other countries were displaced abroad. Additionally, 48 million people were internally displaced in their own countries and 4.1 million sought asylum.

“I’m worried that if the international community is not able to stop these conflicts, we will continue to see the rise in numbers,” Grandi stated.

  • The UN reported that 99 of the more than 160 countries closed their borders due to Coronavirus. They did not make exceptions for refugees or asylum-seekers. The United States created the provision Title 42 which allowed authorities to block asylum-seekers from entry for health reasons.
  • Many responded to the report with hopes that world leaders would step up to the plate. David Miliband, president and CEO of the International Rescue Committee, urged leaders to use this as a wake up call, “The triple threat of conflict, climate change and COVID-19 continues to destroy lives and livelihoods, demanding a truly global response. As one of the world’s wealthiest and most stable regions, the EU can and must be at the forefront of these efforts.”

As the pandemic’s spread starts to close in countries like the U.S. and Britain and borders begin to open once more, many internally displaced people who could not leave their own countries will want to flee abroad. These numbers are expected to continue to grow as a result.

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