fbpx
Connect with us

Sports

Philadelphia 76ers Hire Doc Rivers As Head Coach

Published

on

The Philadelphia 76ers and Doc Rivers have come to an agreement for him to become the franchise’s next head coach.

What we know:

  • According to ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski, Rivers and Sixers management agreed to a five-year deal. Sixers general manager Elton Brand reached out to Rivers and his representation on Monday. Both sides met in Philadelphia on Wednesday to discuss the opening and watch Game 1 of the NBA Finals.
  • This is one of the fastest fired-to-hired turnarounds that an NBA coach has experienced. Rivers parted ways with his head coaching job for the Los Angeles Clippers on Monday, and he got his new offer on Thursday.
  • The Sixers fired former coach Brett Brown in August. The frontrunners for this position were Clippers assistant coach Tyronne Lue and former Houston Rockets coach Mike D’Antoni. It looked like the Sixers had settled on D’Antoni, but Rivers became available and rapidly became the organization’s top choice.
  • Philadelphia is coming off of a disappointing season where they finished 6th in the Eastern Conference and were swept by the Boston Celtics in the first round of the playoffs. The Sixers’ weaknesses were exposed this year, but this team could still be interesting with Rivers as a coach.
  • Sixers forward Tobias Harris had a rough go during this year’s playoffs, but he will now get the chance to reunite with his old coach in Doc Rivers. Rivers coached Harris in 2018 with the Clippers and maximized his play. Before being traded to the Sixers, Harris played the best basketball of his career in Los Angeles, averaging 21 points per game.
  • The main pieces on Philadelphia’s roster are their All-Star duo in Ben Simmons and Joel Embiid. The pair was once seen as a young core, but the perception has shifted to them being underachievers and that they can’t play together. It will be interesting to see how they fit into Rivers’ system. For Simmons, Rivers has had success in the past with a non-shooter playing point guard in Rajon Rondo. In Embiid’s case, Rivers has coached one of the greatest bigs of all time in Kevin Garnett, and there are similarities in their games. It just so happens that Rivers coached Rondo and Garnett on the championship-winning 2008 Boston Celtics team. We’ll have to see if Rivers can maximize this roster and replicate that success.

According to ESPN, the Sixers are hoping to add Alvin Gentry to Rivers’ staff as an assistant. Gentry was let go as head coach of the New Orleans Pelicans this year, but he won a championship in 2015 as an assistant coach with the Golden State Warriors.

Comments

comments

Sagar is a Digital Intern at UnmutedCo. He graduated from Northwestern University with a bachelor's degree in Trumpet Performance and Economics. Sagar writes for Black News Alerts and the BNA Daily Podcast. He also produces the BossFM Morning Show.

Crime

Kansas City Chiefs DE Frank Clark Arrested for Carrying Illegal Weapon

Published

on

Kansas City Chiefs Defensive End Frank Clark was arrested on Sunday for illegal possession of a concealed weapon.

What We Know:

  • Clark, 28, was in Los Angles, CA when LAPD pulled him over for a vehicle code violation. The officer saw an Uzi sticking out of a bag in Clark’s backseat. Clark was in the vehicle with three other passengers at the time of the arrest. He was released on a $35,000 bond, which according to Spolin Law P.C., is the bond amount for possession of a loaded firearm in California.
  • Under Penal Code 30510 PC, Uzi submachine guns are considered assault weapons and per Penal Code 30600 PC, assault weapons are illegal in the state of California. Recently US District Judge Roger Benitez, overturned California’s assault weapon ban, calling it unconstitutional. He compared an AR-15 to a Swiss Army knife and claimed more people have died from the COVID-19 vaccine than from mass shootings in the state. His call to overturn the ban on assault weapons can’t go into effect until the state’s appeal court makes a ruling.
  • This is Clark’s second arrest in California in the last three months. In March, he was pulled over because his vehicle did not showcase a front license plate. Police noticed a part of a weapon sticking out of a bag and then recovered two guns- a handgun and rifle- inside the bag. Both guns were loaded and he was released on a $35,000 bond the following day.
  • In 2014, Clark was arrested for domestic violence and assault while staying at a hotel in Ohio. He was able to get the charges reduced and pled guilty to disorderly conduct. Due to these actions, Clark was removed from the University of Michigan’s football team his senior year. He continued workouts at various training facilities and sought counseling.
  • Clark was the Seattle Seahawks’ 63rd pick in the 2015 NFL draft and played for the organization for four seasons. He had a record of 35 sacks and 136 tackles for the Seahawks. Clark was traded to the Kansas City Chiefs in April 2019, for the first-round draft choice in 2019 and a second-rounder in 2020.
  • Since playing with the Chiefs, Clark has been chosen for the NFL Pro Bowl twice and was a part of the Chiefs Super Bowl-winning team in 2020. When traded to the Chiefs, Clark signed a five-year $104 million contract with the team and is guaranteed $63.5 million. He has had 14 sacks and 66 tackles since starting with the Chiefs.
  • The Chiefs just wrapped up a mandatory minicamp and are aware of Clark’s arrest. Brian McCarthy, an NFL spokesperson, stated that the organization is reviewing Clark’s actions “under the NFL’s personal conduct policy.” 610 Sports host Carrington Harrison believes that the Chiefs will most likely keep Clark on the roaster, but if he is charged with felony gun possession then he likely won’t start in Game 1.

Alex Spiro, Clark’s lawyer, claims that the gun in question belongs to one of Clark’s bodyguards. Clark is set to be in court on October 18th.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

Entertainment

NCAA Women’s Sports Surge in TV Ratings

Published

on

(James Madison University)

ESPN’s coverage of the Women’s College World Series set records for viewership on the network for women’s college sports.

What We Know:

  • ESPN has been broadcasting the WCWS since 2000. Odicci Alexander, a pitcher from James Madison University, was the overarching hero of the series when she led her unseeded team to victory against championship favorite Oklahoma. According to Social Blade, a social media analytics website, she gained more than 50,000 Instagram followers within a week of the win. She is now signed with United States Speciality Sports Association’s Pride, a professional team.
  • The average number of views for the WCWS was 1,203,000, an increase of 10% over 2019. For the championship final between Oklahoma and Florida State, the average number of viewers was a record 1,840,000, a 15% increase. This surge has encouraged ESPN to continue to add women’s coverage across their networks.
  • Nick Dawson, ESPN’s Vice President of Programming for college sports, says they are pushing to get more sports programming onto ABC Saturday afternoon slots. The network has already expanded its coverage to softball, basketball, gymnastics, and volleyball. This year the gymnastics final on ABC averaged 808,000 views which was a 510% increase from the 2019 final broadcasted on ESPNU.
  • Despite women’s sports being unfairly measured against established men’s leagues without being given the same exposure and financial support, the surge in numbers has proven to networks that they are worth broadcasting. Jane McManus, director of the Center for Sports Communication at Marist College, said, “There has been proof of concept for a decade that people are interested in, and will watch, women’s sports.”
  • By having more of a platform, coaches and athletes alike are speaking up about the disparities between men’s and women’s sports. Patty Gasso, Oklahoma’s softball coach, pointed out that issues with the WCWS format, adding off days, eliminating doubleheaders, and ensuring games end at reasonable times needed to be addressed by the NCAA.
  • It now falls upon the networks to include these sports in their conversations. The hope is that media coverage creates a conversation that is not just about athletic performance but incorporates other facets of athlete’s lives much like discussions around men’s sports. The more women’s sports get aired on major networks at primetime slots, the closer this goal gets.

Stories like Odicci Alexander’s seldom get the limelight, but the numbers prove a national interest in seeing more women’s sports highlighted on television. Mary Jo Kane, director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport at the University of Minnesota, stated, “There’s a vast untapped market of people desperately interested in women’s sports. Whether sports media will continue to do that, so we end up with a normal critical mass of coverage as opposed to being treated as a one-off or a surprise, that remains to be seen.”

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

Headlines

The Supreme Court Unanimously Rules the NCAA Cannot Bar Education-Related Benefits, Says It Violates Federal Antitrust Laws

Published

on

The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) specifically ruled that the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) cannot enforce limits on Division I basketball and football players’ college-offered educational benefits.

What We Know:

  • Current NCAA rules state that colleges cannot pay student-athletes. In addition, institutions must cap scholarship amounts to the cost of attendance. The association implemented these rules because officials felt that if they paid athletes, fans would begin to criticize the players’ amateur statuses. This, in turn, would result in fewer admirers.
  • However, SCOTUS rejected their claims; the Justices unanimously ruled that the NCAA cannot restrict relatively modest payments to their players based on amateurism. Justice Neil Gorsuch wrote the court’s opinion, citing that doing so violates antitrust laws.

“The NCAA is not above the law,” wrote Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

  • This case has been around for a while now. Last year, former players, including West Virginia football player Shawne Alston, sued the NCAA for their unfair laws. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in San Francisco determined the collegiate association could not limit educational benefits. This decision permitted payments for things such as musical instruments, scientific equipment, postgraduate scholarships, tutoring, study abroad, academic awards, and internships.
  • Despite this, the appeals court did not allow the NCAA to provide athletes with a salary. Therefore, Alston and others took the case to SCOTUS.
  • The unanimous ruling did not directly imply if institutions can now compensate their players. Instead, Monday’s verdict permits those playing Division I men’s or women’s basketball or Bowl Subdivision football to receive cash/cash-equivalent awards based on their academics or graduation. Universities can now offer scholarships for students to complete undergraduate or graduate degrees. Students may also partake in paid internships once they complete their collegiate sports eligibility.
  • SCOTUS will not require schools to provide the benefits. Alongside this, conferences can impose prohibitions on the benefits if the member school chooses to. However, a conference cannot limit or prevent said assets.
  • With the new, multi-level, victory, the athletes feel ready to challenge other aspects of these rules. One lawyer, Steve Berman, already opened another case against the NCAA related to this one. He will ask for the courts to prevent the NCAA from maintaining rules that restrict the amount of name, image, and likeness (NIL) payments available to athletes.

Berman will also seek “unspecified damages” based on the share of television-rights money and social media earnings plaintiffs could have received if NIL compensation limits did not exist.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

LIVE TALK RADIO

BNA DAILY PODCAST

Trending