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Election 2020

Trump Calls for Biden to be Indicted with Just Days Before the Election

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President Donald Trump with Scott Atlas, coronavirus adviser, during a press briefing at the White House Wednesday. (Image via Oliver Contreras/New York Times)
President Donald Trump with Scott Atlas, coronavirus adviser, during a press briefing at the White House Wednesday. (Image via Oliver Contreras/New York Times)

This 2020 election has had a change in narratives the past few weeks, from the president’s health to talks of the 25th amendment and now President Donald Trump calling for the Democratic Nominee Joe Biden to be indicted.

What We Know:

  • In a Fox Business interview this past week, Trump spoke about documents released by the Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe, related to FBI misconduct and the previous Russian investigation. The president is now blasting Hillary Clinton for her email scandal and is calling out both Joe Biden and Barack Obama to be charged for allegedly spying on his campaign.
  • Trump told host Maria Bartiromo, “Unless Bill Barr indicts these people for crimes — the greatest political crime in history of our country — then we’re going to get little satisfaction”. He reiterated that that includes both Biden and Obama.

“This was the greatest political crime in the history of our country and that includes Obama and it includes Biden. These are people that spied on my campaign and we have everything,” Trump stated on Fox Business.

  • According to Ratcliffe, the documents demonstrated how Clinton approved of an attempt to construct a scandal against President Trump by linking him to “Putin and the Russians” for hacking the Democratic National Committee. Biden would, of course, be involved and Obama was accused of being aware. It’s worthy to note that both Democrats and Republicans on the Senate Intelligence Committee have previously rejected these claims due to a lack of factual information.
  • Ratcliffe wrote a letter to Senator Lindsey Graham explaining how the Intelligence Committee wasn’t aware of the “accuracy of this allegation or the extent to which the Russian intelligence analysis may reflect exaggeration or fabrication”. This prompted the president to quickly target his rivals and call for their indictment.
  • “Look, we have all the evidence in the world, in addition to that I released everything, every document, I don’t care what it pertains to, I released everything. I’ve declassified, I’m the only one in the country that has the power to do that. I’ve declassified everything. I did it a year ago, actually, for Bill Barr. I declassified everything so they would have no — so there’s not a document they can’t have,” he explained.

Moreover, Trump later questioned William “Bill” Barr’s reputation. “To be honest, Bill Barr’s gonna go down either as the greatest attorney general in the history of the country or he’s gonna go down as a very sad, sad situation,” he said. This comes as president and Barr are at odds over another investigation. Trump went on to say that Barr has all the information he needs and it would look bad on his part should he not pursue the president’s claims.

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Javier Garay is Media & News SVCS Intern at UnmutedCo. He is currently enrolled in the University of North Georgia seeking a bachelor's degree in Film/Digital Media with a concentration in Media Studies. Javier writes for Black News Alerts (BNA) along with social media management for both BNA and BossFM, and is a part of the BNA Daily Podcast Team.

Election 2020

Supreme Court Will Not Extend Wisconsin Mail-in Voting Deadline

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The Supreme Court reached a 5-3 decision Monday to reject an extension for mail-in ballots in Wisconsin.

What We Know:

  • Wisconsin Democrats pushed the court to allow for ballots received up to six days after Election Day to be counted, so long as they were postmarked by November 3rd. The court’s decision means that mail-in ballots in Wisconsin can only be counted if they are received by Election Day.
  • Justices Elena Kagan, Sonia Sotomayor, and Stephen Breyer dissented from the decision. Chief Justice John Roberts wrote in his concurring opinion that this case would have been “federal intrusion on state lawmaking processes”. This is the latest example of federal courts deciding not to change voting laws right before the election.
  • The Supreme Court also ruled in a similar case in Pennsylvania but allowed the deadline for mail-in ballots to be extended. This is because the decision to extend the deadline was originally made by a Pennsylvania state court, not a federal court, and they were just upholding the decision.

“Different bodies of law and different precedents govern these two situations and require, in these particular circumstances, that we allow the modification of election rules in Pennsylvania but not Wisconsin.” – Chief Justice John Roberts

  • Justice Kagan wrote in her dissent “As the COVID pandemic rages, the Court has failed to adequately protect the Nation’s voters . . . Tens of thousands of Wisconsinites, through no fault of their own, may receive their ballots too late to return them by Election Day.”

The Wisconsin Democratic Party continues to educate voters and is urging people to hand-deliver their ballots so they are submitted in time.

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Election 2020

Final Presidential Debate: Takeaways and Analysis

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President Donald Trump and Joe Biden faced off in the final presidential debate of the 2020 election on Thursday October 22nd at 9 pm EST. (Graphic via Chelsea Stahl / NBC News)
President Donald Trump and Joe Biden faced off in the final presidential debate of the 2020 election on Thursday October 22nd at 9 pm EST. (Graphic via Chelsea Stahl / NBC News)

After a chaotic first debate where President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden sparred aggressively, this final debate saw a huge turnaround compared to what voter’s received last time. With White House correspondent Kristin Welker as moderator, who was praised for her performance, the debate proceeded accordingly. Both candidates allowed each other to talk and had more respectful tones, even when on the offensive.

What We Know:

The moderator was able to roll through all the topics in the allotted time for last night’s debate, much of which was never clearly answered in the previous one due to its disastrous outcome. Biden once again held his own while under fire and greatly avoided any slip-ups that would have caused Republicans to question his age and mental acuity. Trump, in a much more collective manner, stood his own as well. As the incumbent, he didn’t bring anything else new to the table but reiterated his attacks on the Biden’s family and questioned the Democrat’s responses on key issues.

Covid-19 finally hits the stage

  • The Trump campaign reportedly complained that this debate was supposed to be on foreign policy, most likely for the president to speak on what he sees as accomplishments in trading, the Middle East, and Syria and target Biden’s son’s business ties to China.
  • Instead, the debate began with the COVID-19 pandemic, a topic which polls suggest is of greater interest to the American public currently. Trump didn’t seem to offer any new insight, only reiterated a vaccine is in the works and expects distribution in a few weeks. After his diagnosis of COVID-19 earlier this month, he used it as a way to promote new drugs that are being used as treatment and saying he’s probably “immune” now.
  • During Biden’s turn, he went on the attack pointing out how Trump has repeatedly downplayed the virus and how it would just disappear. He quoted the over 220,000 American deaths to the virus and stated 200,000 more could perish by the end of 2020.
  • The rest of this topic saw back and forth from both candidates. Trump continued to give reassurance on how everything is getting better, without evidence, and how lockdowns are not the solution. Biden countered by insisting he will “shut down the virus” not the U.S when addressing the pandemic. He also frequently advocated for mask usage and social distancing throughout the event.

Seemingly inevitable Hunter Biden topic

  • Ever since the last debate, when Trump brought up Hunter Biden, it was set in stone that his son would once again come up during debate night. It didn’t take long for the president to bring up the former vice-president’s family. Trump claimed that Biden profited from his son’s overseas deals in Ukraine and China. He cited recent stories about information acquired from Hunter’s laptop.
  • Biden’s response was a simple denial of those claims. He followed the financial dispute by turning it over to Trump’s taxes and business ties to China. The shift forced the president to spend time explaining how he “pre-paid” millions in taxes and vaguely describing when he’d release his tax returns. Biden confidently asserted how he and his running mate have already released theirs and asked Trump “what are you hiding?”
  • The exchange, being analyzed from various different angles, was one of the few parts that would have left a voter confused. Trump was clearly seeking to draw blood for personal attacks on Biden’s family. In the end, those attempts to make his rival lose his cool failed, which resulted in a cleaner debate.

A focus on immigration in the U.S

  • During Trump’s first run for the White House, he hammered onto the issues of immigration as one of the main issues he wanted to tackle. Now after four years, Trump tried to downplay some of the more extreme steps he’s taken while in office. His famous Mexico border wall did not come up.
  • A question the president received about immigration was the separation of children from undocumented migrants under his current administration’s policies. He quickly turned the conversation over to detention facilities near the border and brought up what his term “cages,” created by the Obama administration before him to temporary house undocumented minors.
  • Biden, with some visible annoyance, implied that all the children of undocumented migrants came over with their parents and it was these unfair separations that make the U.S a “laughing stock”.
  • The handling of immigration has been heavily criticized under Trump’s administration these past four years ranging from I.C.E. raids, the border wall, and children cry for their parents which still may be fresh in voters’ minds. Trump’s only rebuttal to that was the children were “well taken care of” and that the facilities were “so clean”. It probably didn’t help his case at that point.

Trump and Biden on criminal justice/racism

  • One of Trump’s biggest fluke’s last debate was when he turned the conversation into race relations. He skipped around the topic and notably refused to directly condemn white supremacy and in fact told the Proud Boy’s to “stand back and stand by”. This time, it appeared that Trump did his homework and remained calmer.
  • He went ahead and bragged about his cross-party criminal justice reform and aid to historically black colleges. He attacked Biden’s involvement in a draconian crime bill in the mid-90s which consequently lead Black Americans to prisons. The moment Biden had a chance to speak on new reforms to correct that, the president questioned Biden on why he didn’t accomplish more under former President Barack Obama.
  • “It’s all talk but no action with these politicians,” Trump stated. “Why didn’t you get it done? You had eight years to get it done.”
  • For older viewers who watched this portion of the debate closely, it would have been interesting considering the crime in the 1990s. Both candidates spoke on the number of felons to whom they gave clemency and their efforts for reforms in the justice system. In a year plagued with social injustice, this is more important than ever.

In the grand scheme of things, the final presidential debate was more along the lines of what voters expect to see of a future leader. The dumbfounding first debate will certainly be one marked in history and talked about for generations. As of this point in the election, polls have demonstrated most Americans have made their choice with more than 50 million people already have cast their votes. There is a small chance this debate turned the tide to favor either party.

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Election 2020

US Supreme Court Rules Pennsylvania Mail-In Ballots WILL Count Up to Three Days Post-Election Day

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An official mail-in ballot for the 2020 General Election in the United States is shown, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2020, in Marple Township, Pa. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
An official mail-in ballot for the 2020 General Election in the United States is shown, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2020, in Marple Township, Pa. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

This unusual election year has left many split on deciding how to vote. For those mail-in voters, a Supreme Court ruling has permitted Pennsylvania to count ballots that are mailed in up to three days following the Nov. 3 election.

What We Know:

  • Although the outcome showed justices divided 4-4 on Monday, it wasn’t enough to overturn the decision. The state Supreme Court ruling will stand and it requires all county election officials to receive all mail-in ballot received up until Nov. 6 regardless of the postmark is unclear and long as it meets the time constraint.
  • In this scenario, Republicans have been the main opposition, including President Donald Trump’s campaign. The pushback from conservatives has been over the deadline extension for counted votes. They argue that it violates a federal law that sets Election Day as the first Tuesday of November, typical after the first Monday, and the constitutionality of this choice is reserved for lawmakers, not the courts.
  • Lawrence Tabas, the state Republican Party chairman, has stated that the party disagrees with the decision and, citing the tight 4-4 decision, “it only underscores the importance of having a full Supreme Court as soon as possible”.

“To be clear, the Supreme Court decided not to grant a stay — which does not mean the actions of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court would withstand a legal challenge to their judicial overreach should the court hear the case,” Tabas said.

  • On the other side of things, Nancy Patton Mills, chairwoman of the Pennsylvania Democratic Party, blamed Republicans for attempting to invoke confusion among voters who have yet to pick a side this election. She said in a statement that the outcome of this ruling is “a significant victory for Pennsylvania voters”.
  • The state’s high court has considered that postal service delays may end up invalidating a large portion of mail-in ballots. Since the COVID-19 pandemic has hindered the regular election process, the state’s courts acted upon the power they have to extend election deadlines during a disaster emergency, of which this health crisis can be considered one.

Since the decision, Chief Justice John Roberts along with liberal Justices Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Clarence Thomas banded together to reject Pennsylvania Republicans’ attempt to block the state court ruling, which would have halted absentee ballots by Election Day.

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